About SMART Recovery support-groups

Definition Of Smart


A popular alternative just like Alcoholics Anonymous which is a 12 step group is SMART. People with other mental health problems such as depression and anxiety can also benefit from SMART.

People that are addicted to any form of drug can get the help in overcoming it using the Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART) programs. The aim of this program is to help treat addiction by getting people to focus on the thoughts and emotions behind the addiction.

Participants of SMART groups master skills which enable them to manage their urges and cravings in the long run.


The latest methods of stopping the dependency on drugs are used on SMART program to help the members.


SMART is regularly updated to provide strategies researchers find most efficient.

The positive effects of the SMART program have been appreciated even by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the American Academy of Family Physicians.


How Smart Works

As contrasted with 12-step programs that make people admit helplessness about their dependence, SMART is considered a self-empowering program. Volunteers who have received the training provide assistance to the participants to examine their specific behaviour and to locate the problems that need maximum attention. Then, participants undergo self trust training, which enables them to control their dependence behaviour. Cognitive behavioural techniques and motivational enhancement are some of the methods used in SMART. A 4-point program is taught to aid in mastering these skills.



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The Four Point Programme

The 4 point that are followed are clearly outlined in the programs manual. To help the recovering user remain clean, the handbook also contains tips and exercises that can be used.

The 4-points do not constitute a Program. A participant may deal with points in any order depending on what he or she needs.

If you or a loved one has participated in a 12-step program and found it unhelpful you will find SMART to be a better alternative for you. Get the help you need finding a SMART meeting close to you call 0800 246 1509.


  • Building And Maintaining Motivation
  • Achieving recovery that lasts will depend on whether or not the recovering addict is willing to remain sober.
  • Participants are encouraged to make a list of priorities and weigh the costs and benefits of using the drugs versus being sober.
  • Coping With The Urges
  • The triggers behind the urge to use is what the second point focuses on.
  • Changing their thoughts and activities are some of the techniques used to overcome these desires.
  • Also, participants find and cope with irrational visions of urges to use the substance.
  • Controlling Actions, Reactions And Reflections
  • In point three, one is taught how to bring the mind, emotions, and actions under control to avoid yielding to cravings and falling back to drug abuse.
  • The feeling of loneliness and despair can be contained by the addict themselves.
  • Living A Balanced Life
  • It requires commitment in order for the addict to get back to living a normal kind of life.
  • It is crucial for a successful recovery that the person learns how to live a healthy and sober life.
  • At this point, the recovering user will need to make a note of the things that matter to them.
  • The future is approached realistically by setting out attainable goals and milestones.

Comparison To The 12 Stage Plans

The SMART 4-Point and the 12-Step programs do share some similar approaches. Both aim at helping substance addicted patients quit the habits. Both programs are private ones, which means that each participant 's identity stays within the group. The objectives have been realized in both of them.

The basic difference between SMART and 12-step programs is in how these program define addiction.

The people that are dependant on the drugs are not said to be "addicts" in the SMART program. The reason why these labels are avoided is because they are seen as counterproductive and even discouraging. In SMART, recovery is for a set time, not a lifetime. Participants can consider themselves as graduated from recovery to begin a new and a healthy life.

Sometimes, people do not join a 12-step group on their own accord simply because they don't like the idea of admitting their powerlessness and submitting to some higher power. It is the willingness of a person to overcome the dependence that is used in the SMART program.

There is always help for participants in both the programs. It's up for the particular individual to decide which one will be most helpful for him or her. In the words written in the SMART Recovery Handbook, "What works for one person in one situation may not work for another in the same situation."


Qualifying For The Programme

The unique feature of SMART is that its participants are able to "graduate" from recovery. Despite the understanding that relapses can occur SMART does not consider a relapse as an essential part of the recovery process.

According to SMART, the participants don't feel the urge to use at the end of the program and they have total control over their lives.

Participants of SMART when they have reached the final stage will be considered as having the skills needed to maintain a sober life.


Is Smart Right For You

Anyone suffering from any addiction can benefit from SMART. It also helps those battling behaviour issues such as gambling or eating disorders. Benefits can also be derived by people who are suffering from mental disorders, which are co-occurring such as depression.