Al-Anon Family Groups support-groups

Getting To Know More About Al-Anon

Al-Anon is a network of family support groups, which helps persons whose families are affected by alcoholism. Groups like these have been formed with the sole aim of being beneficial and therapeutic to such families.


Al-Anon was founded in 1951 with the aim of providing support for those affected by alcohol abuse by loved ones. This organization was founded by Lois Wilson, who is also popular by the name of Lois W and Al Anon came into being 16 years after the formation of Alcoholics Anonymous [AA] by her husband. Lois W sort to help others suffering at the hands of alcoholics like herself. Al-Anon is an organization self-supported through member donations. The meetings aim to help members cope with and know how to support and help their loved ones fighting alcoholism.


The key activity of Al-Anon is to support its members - drunkards' relatives - by making them realize that they are not alone.


Alcoholism Affecting A Family

Since it has a deleterious influence on both the drinker and those around them, Al-anon treats the disease of alcoholism as a family illness. Important to the alcoholic's recovery is the friend and family support system.

Lack of understanding the cause of their loved one's drinking problem makes family members suffer self-condemnation and also not know how to deal with the problem. Support meetings can help deal about these issues in the best way while also making members understand that alcoholism should be treated as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings For Teenagers

The youth are also affected by alcoholism in their family, so Al-Anon has formed a wing to help the youngsters called Al-teen.

Teens get to associate with each other and share experiences of how alcoholism has affected them.


Why Join An Al-Anon Group

Members of Al-Anon benefit from being introduced to a number of people and families who could have suffered from the problem of alcoholism. All members have worked through some issues though the details may differ. With this program, you get to share experiences with people who have faced situations similar to yours. These meetings are widespread all over the country. Call us on 0800 246 1509 to help you find one near you.


What You Should Anticipate From A Meeting

The meetings held by Al-Anon are open to any individual who could be affected by the alcoholism of another individual. If you are worried about somebody's heavy drinking or if the drunkard's lifestyle somehow affects your life , Al-Anon will help you.

People always fear the unknown, and so the first meeting at Al-Anon is bound to be a challenge. When thinking of attending a meeting, some things should be kept in mind

  • Al-Anon is anonymous meaning you do not identify yourself in the meeting
  • All the members of this group have had an encounter with an alcoholic in their lives
  • While members are encouraged to speak up and discuss their problem, they are under no obligation to do so
  • Different Types Of Meetings Are Held For Everyone
  • There are meetings where you may not be helped but someone else might be.
  • Al-Anon is not an organization which is based on any religion
  • Meetings are focused on Al-Anon 12 step program

Al-Anon meetings are carried out under a slogan that encourages all attendees to "take only what they like, leaving the rest." The shared stories, of experiences, hardships, and victories encourages members to know how to handle their experiences.


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The 12 Parts Of Al-Anon

The recovery stages are outlined before the meeting starts. These twelve steps are an abridged, almost verbatim, quote from the same-name program of Alcoholics Anonymous. An Al-Anon member is required to take on a sponsor who will help them work through the program and provide support when needed. The steps are as follows

  • We did admit we were powerless over alcoholism, that our lives became unmanageable indeed.
  • Members learn to accept alcoholism as a disease they cannot control in others.
  • Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • Trying to change a person that has been affected by alcoholism can be a huge task and lead to breakdown.
  • After they admit they are powerless, they learn how to accept that they can be helped to regain their sanity.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  • Learning to let go is a primary step in the program and acceptance.
  • Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • This is where the journey of self-discovery begins.
  • They then come up with how they have been affected by the condition and what they might have done to hurt others or themselves.
  • Have admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the true cause of our wrong doings.
  • Then follows going through the list one item at a time and dealing with each.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This is a very important step, as it is the complete acceptance of the process of recovery supported by a Higher Power.
  • Humbly ask him to remove our shortcomings.
  • This part of the twelve step process helps people realize how controlling or judgmental they have been towards an alcoholic and how counterproductive it is.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  • Usually, making up for the wrongs done begins with oneself.
  • Many people blame themselves for their addiction of their loved one.
  • They must be willing and prepared to forgive themselves and to make amends.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  • Working on the steps of recovery and help after forgiving yourself is the next step.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Going through the 12 steps is a process which will take time.
  • Members are ready with an inventory, yet making an error is common.
  • Step 10 identifies this is an ongoing process.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This step is a personal, spiritual one; it comprises acceptance and comfort in view of the great stress of recovery.
  • Having experienced a spiritual awakening thanks to these steps, we tried to spread the word to other people, and to always practice these principles.
  • This stage appreciates the fact that the process is long and doesnt end after a while.
  • Members are then motivated to assist other members with what they have learned.

A Greater Understanding Of The Higher Power

Members do have an acceptance of a higher power, even though Al-Anon is not a religious program. The term "higher power" is, however, open to interpretation according to the personal beliefs of individuals. Al-Anon gladly accepts members from all religious traditions and denominations; nobody is forced to alter their beliefs here.